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“Oho!” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 5)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“The Marmelade Surah On Allah” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 4)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Those things breaking the surface look like fingers. ” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XVI)

Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” and dealing with the processes of passing, disappearance, & death. As David Vichnar has observed (see here), Makin’s is writing born out of “the obsession of the I that wants to die without ceasing to be I.” … Continue reading

“The Song Of A Clothes Iron On The Bridge Of Argenteuil” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 3)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Isn’t civilisation like a condom?” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 2)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

Richard Makin, WORK (Pre-publication excerpt)

We at Equus Press are proud to announce the planned publication (in late 2019) of Richard Makin’s Work, a piece accompanying (in its newly rewritten form) Makin’s Mourning (Equus Press, 2015). Work thus both precedes (its previous version published by Great Works in 2006) and follows Mourning, continuing the “work” of Mourning by textually reckoning and coming to terms with “the minutiae … Continue reading

“The Grand Boche Looks On…” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 1)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
"It is the business of the future to be dangerous" // A.N. Whitehead

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"Poetism is the crown of life; Constructivism is its basis" // Karel Teige

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“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
July 2019
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