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Equus Press

EQUUS was established in 2011 with the objective of publishing innovative & translocal writing.
Equus Press has written 167 posts for equus press

CHAPTER FIVE: Prague 1992 (excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil)

Equus Press is proud to announce the forthcoming publication of MENTAL SHRAPNEL, a novel by Phillip O’Neil. From the pre-publication blurb: “Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of … Continue reading

“The scheduled massacre still took place in the park that afternoon” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XX)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Imagine a room about a film about a journey to a book” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter II)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“A bare monochrome terrain with two distant block houses” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter IV)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

Chapter Thirty-Five: WarZone 2008 (excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil)

Equus Press is proud to announce the forthcoming publication of MENTAL SHRAPNEL, a novel by Phillip O’Neil. From the pre-publication blurb: “Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of … Continue reading

“Please have your kidneys ready at the barrier” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXXII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“She gave birth to the sky under the spin of an abandoned galaxy. And it was indeed essential for us to ration ourselves” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XIV)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Forgetrance. Today is forgetfulness day; it’s one hundred years since memory collapsed into a trench.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XVII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“I doubt this will survive you – screams in the street, screams in the sky. There’s no time for quotation” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXVIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“His next novel was a pocketbook: the reader could take it to a riot and it wouldn’t slow her down” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Occasionally the narrative appears to run on, of a sudden switches penitent for scribe” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXI)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“The tale speaks for itself, of our exodus. Origin is late (earlier in compounds) and rumoured uncertain” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXIX)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“A border or threshold — the development of meaning here is a puzzle” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“THE FASCIST & THE FEMINIST: A Visit to Mr. Language & Ms. Spectacle,” by Thor Garcia (Part One)

“Hide and seek wasn’t a game that day. I devoured his book in one breathless sitting. I see you now. Every little helps.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXIV)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Inaction in action has the same meaning. Notwithstanding, there is much humour.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter V)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

Ken Nash, 3 stories from LIFE RAFT

In a review of The Brain Harvest, Ken Nash’s first story collection, artist Clare Le Couteur describes a typical Nash story thus: “You turn it over again in your hands, like a wooden puzzle. You can figure out how it comes apart and fits back together, but still can’t seem to fit it in your … Continue reading

“The process in the mind corresponds precisely to the process on paper” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XVIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“These events appear unconnected” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XIX)

Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” and dealing with the processes of passing, disappearance, & death. As David Vichnar has observed (see here), Makin’s is writing born out of “the obsession of the I that wants to die without ceasing to be I.” … Continue reading

Melchior Vischer, TEXTS FOR DADAGLOBE

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“This passage contains some words that don’t belong” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXX)

Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” and dealing with the processes of passing, disappearance, & death. As David Vichnar has observed (see here), Makin’s is writing born out of “the obsession of the I that wants to die without ceasing to be I.” … Continue reading

“Universe” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 6)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Oho!” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 5)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“The Marmelade Surah On Allah” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 4)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Those things breaking the surface look like fingers. ” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XVI)

Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” and dealing with the processes of passing, disappearance, & death. As David Vichnar has observed (see here), Makin’s is writing born out of “the obsession of the I that wants to die without ceasing to be I.” … Continue reading

“The Song Of A Clothes Iron On The Bridge Of Argenteuil” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 3)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Isn’t civilisation like a condom?” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 2)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

Richard Makin, WORK (Pre-publication excerpt)

We at Equus Press are proud to announce the planned publication (in late 2019) of Richard Makin’s Work, a piece accompanying (in its newly rewritten form) Makin’s Mourning (Equus Press, 2015). Work thus both precedes (its previous version published by Great Works in 2006) and follows Mourning, continuing the “work” of Mourning by textually reckoning and coming to terms with “the minutiae … Continue reading

“The Grand Boche Looks On…” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 1)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“ROTATION REROTATION SUPRAROTATION”

PRAGUE DADA & THE REVISIONIST POLITICS OF INTERWAR AVANT-GARDISM   It is a frequently repeated assertion that Dada, like the Plague of 1348, passed the City of a Thousand Spires by – an assertion given credence by the few commentaries & ripostes published by the likes of Roman Jakobson & Karel Teige between 1921 & 1926, … Continue reading

This is Not an Artifact: on Germán Sierra’s The Artifact

“This is not real life. This is not fiction. This is not a novel. This is not an exit.[…] This is not a dream. This is not a pipe. This is not a love song.” (19) It is always way easier to say what things aren’t than call them what they are – as negative … Continue reading

Tristan Tzara, Surrealism and the Postwar Era, Part One (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Eight)

Tristan Tzara’s lecture, delivered in March 1946 in Prague, is introduced with an apology for “the Munich betrayal” and French political participation in it. Tzara then presents a thorough reflection on the birth and development of the Dada movement. Emphasising the feelings of frustration of the 1914-1918 war generation, he shows how “Dada was born … Continue reading

“A Possible Story of the Avant-garde” – A Review of David Vichnar’s SUBTEXTS (2015)

SUBTEXTS (Prague: Litteraria Pragensia Books) is an a-temporal book. In his introduction to it, David Vichnar posits an almost century-long discussion of the possibilities, or rather the impossibilities of the avant-garde(s) facing the ever-new neo-avant-gardes in their original a-temporal context. So, we get it from the start that SUBTEXTS leans heavily on their contemporary context(s).

Mitteleuropäisch Fever Dream

“The Combinations ranks on my Holy Shit-O-Meter! in close proximity with Ada, or Ardor, by Vladimir Nabokov and Against Nature, by Joris-Karl Huysmans.” Karl Wolff gives the National Book Critics Circle treatment to Louis Armand’s THE COMBINATIONS (excerpted from a 5-part review originally published by Driftless Area Review)

LUGUBRIOUS STEMWINDERS

Richard Makin is an extraordinary artist, easily the most insubordinate, bad-boy writer working today. He cares not a lick about narrative or character or other such theories that any child can understand. He scorns your traditions and conventions, which are useless nonsense anyway. What have you been going on about again? Oh, that old-hat stuff … Continue reading

František Halas, On Dadaism (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Seven)

František Halas (1901—1949) was one of the most significant Czech lyric poets of the 20th century, an essayist, and a translator. He was self-taught, without higher education. After 1921 he started publishing in the communist newspapers Rovnost and Sršatec, and together with Bedřich Václavek co-edited the avant-garde magazines Pásmo and Fronta. In 1926 he became … Continue reading

extended, experimented, mutated & shuffled

The Combinations truly is a contemporary book that: falls into the category of Maximalist Literature (a new addition to the list for people into that) since this is a book of (the good kind of) excesses and, runs in the line of fun-having absurdity, anxiety & conspiracy centred novels that Pynchon’s name is attached to.

"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
"It is the business of the future to be dangerous" // A.N. Whitehead

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"Poetism is the crown of life; Constructivism is its basis" // Karel Teige

Goodreads

“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
April 2020
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