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Equus Press

EQUUS was established in 2011 with the objective of publishing innovative & translocal writing.
Equus Press has written 147 posts for equus press

“This passage contains some words that don’t belong” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXX)

Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” and dealing with the processes of passing, disappearance, & death. As David Vichnar has observed (see here), Makin’s is writing born out of “the obsession of the I that wants to die without ceasing to be I.” … Continue reading

“Universe” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 6)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Oho!” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 5)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“The Marmelade Surah On Allah” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 4)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Those things breaking the surface look like fingers. ” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XVI)

Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” and dealing with the processes of passing, disappearance, & death. As David Vichnar has observed (see here), Makin’s is writing born out of “the obsession of the I that wants to die without ceasing to be I.” … Continue reading

“The Song Of A Clothes Iron On The Bridge Of Argenteuil” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 3)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“Isn’t civilisation like a condom?” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 2)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

Richard Makin, WORK (Pre-publication excerpt)

We at Equus Press are proud to announce the planned publication (in late 2019) of Richard Makin’s Work, a piece accompanying (in its newly rewritten form) Makin’s Mourning (Equus Press, 2015). Work thus both precedes (its previous version published by Great Works in 2006) and follows Mourning, continuing the “work” of Mourning by textually reckoning and coming to terms with “the minutiae … Continue reading

“The Grand Boche Looks On…” – Melchior Vischer’s Texts for the DADAGLOBE Anthology (Part 1)

Prague Dadaist Melchior Vischer (1895-1975; for more info see here and here) was a prominent figure in early 20s Prague’s artistic scene. After serving briefly in WW1 and then graduating from Charles University, Vischer worked as a theatre critic for the major daily Praguer Presse, where he was an early champion of the work of Franz … Continue reading

“ROTATION REROTATION SUPRAROTATION”

PRAGUE DADA & THE REVISIONIST POLITICS OF INTERWAR AVANT-GARDISM   It is a frequently repeated assertion that Dada, like the Plague of 1348, passed the City of a Thousand Spires by – an assertion given credence by the few commentaries & ripostes published by the likes of Roman Jakobson & Karel Teige between 1921 & 1926, … Continue reading

This is Not an Artifact: on Germán Sierra’s The Artifact

“This is not real life. This is not fiction. This is not a novel. This is not an exit.[…] This is not a dream. This is not a pipe. This is not a love song.” (19) It is always way easier to say what things aren’t than call them what they are – as negative … Continue reading

Tristan Tzara, Surrealism and the Postwar Era, Part One (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Eight)

Tristan Tzara’s lecture, delivered in March 1946 in Prague, is introduced with an apology for “the Munich betrayal” and French political participation in it. Tzara then presents a thorough reflection on the birth and development of the Dada movement. Emphasising the feelings of frustration of the 1914-1918 war generation, he shows how “Dada was born … Continue reading

“A Possible Story of the Avant-garde” – A Review of David Vichnar’s SUBTEXTS (2015)

SUBTEXTS (Prague: Litteraria Pragensia Books) is an a-temporal book. In his introduction to it, David Vichnar posits an almost century-long discussion of the possibilities, or rather the impossibilities of the avant-garde(s) facing the ever-new neo-avant-gardes in their original a-temporal context. So, we get it from the start that SUBTEXTS leans heavily on their contemporary context(s).

Mitteleuropäisch Fever Dream

“The Combinations ranks on my Holy Shit-O-Meter! in close proximity with Ada, or Ardor, by Vladimir Nabokov and Against Nature, by Joris-Karl Huysmans.” Karl Wolff gives the National Book Critics Circle treatment to Louis Armand’s THE COMBINATIONS (excerpted from a 5-part review originally published by Driftless Area Review)

LUGUBRIOUS STEMWINDERS

Richard Makin is an extraordinary artist, easily the most insubordinate, bad-boy writer working today. He cares not a lick about narrative or character or other such theories that any child can understand. He scorns your traditions and conventions, which are useless nonsense anyway. What have you been going on about again? Oh, that old-hat stuff … Continue reading

František Halas, On Dadaism (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Seven)

František Halas (1901—1949) was one of the most significant Czech lyric poets of the 20th century, an essayist, and a translator. He was self-taught, without higher education. After 1921 he started publishing in the communist newspapers Rovnost and Sršatec, and together with Bedřich Václavek co-edited the avant-garde magazines Pásmo and Fronta. In 1926 he became … Continue reading

extended, experimented, mutated & shuffled

The Combinations truly is a contemporary book that: falls into the category of Maximalist Literature (a new addition to the list for people into that) since this is a book of (the good kind of) excesses and, runs in the line of fun-having absurdity, anxiety & conspiracy centred novels that Pynchon’s name is attached to.

GlassHouse & Natural Complexions – New Equus Press Releases

Equss Press is delighted to announce the forthcoming publication of two new titles, Natural Complexions by D. Harlan Wilson and GlassHouse by Louis Armand, two important works by two contemporary innovators. 

Jiří Frejka, Notes towards a dada theatre (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Six)

JIŘÍ FREJKA (1904-1952) was a theatre director and theorist, who made his debut in 1923 with his own parodic variety show Kithairon. In early 1925, he co-founded (with Jindřich Honzl and E.F. Burian) the Theatre of the Youth (Divadlo mladých), which in October that year became the Liberated Theatre (on Karel Tiege’s advice, after Alexander … Continue reading

Walter Serner, Last Loosening – 1918 Dada Manifesto (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Five)

Walter Serner was born into a Jewish family as Walter Eduard Seligmann on January 15, 1889 in the Bohemian spa town of Karlovy Vary (Karlsbad at that time). His father, Berthold Seligmann, owned the town’s major newspaper, the Karlsbader Zeitung, for which Walter wrote an arts column. In 1909, he graduated from the gymnasium in Kadaň … Continue reading

“Creative Dada” – Bedřich Václavek’s Eulogy on Walter Serner (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Four)

Bedřich Václavek (1897-1943) was a Czech Marxist aesthetician, literary theorist and critic. In the 1920s, as a Devětsil member, he was an early advocate of poetism, with emphasis on proletarian art. In the 1930s, he was active as a spokesman for the Left Front movement where he developed his theory of socialist realism. During Nazi … Continue reading

“The Poet of the Earth” – Tristan Tzara in Czechoslovakia (Prague Dada Miscellany – Part Three)

Adolf Hoffmeister (1902-1973) was a Czech writer, journalist, playwright, painter, caricaturist, translator, diplomat, lawyer, and traveller. In 1920 he became the youngest co-founder of the Devětsil art group. In 1922 he made the first of the many journeys to Paris, where he regularly met with the international arts scene, many of whose representatives he would interview … Continue reading

“After art ceases to be art, its corpse will be an honest art corpse” – Prague Dada Miscellany (Part Two)

Jiří Voskovec (1905-1981) was a Czech actor, writer, dramatist, and director who became an American citizen in 1955. Throughout much of his early career he was associated with the Liberated Theatre, which he co-directed with fellow actor and playwright Jan Werich. He immigrated to the US in 1939 and again in 1948 with the onset of … Continue reading

“Why the Police is Taking Note of Us” – Prague Dada Miscellany (Part One)

Equus Press is starting a mini-series of articles which bring first-ever English translations of primary and critical texts to do with the under-explored topic of Prague Dada. This instalment combines three articles published between 1925 and 1927: “Dada Creative”, on the strenghts of German dada, by prominent literary critic Bedřich Václavek, “Dada and Surrealism”, a … Continue reading

Dagger (excerpt from TUND)

DAGGER 1 The sun fell down on California. Inside a large beach villa, lights flared. The place belonged to Pete Dagger, all‐star American writer. Dagger was among the biggest of the writers, perhaps the largest of the era. He was a top multi‐millionaire popular artist who was loved by the critics. He was huge with the academics, who sucked from … Continue reading

Lumpenproletariat. Writing Attack / Antisystem / Subliterature

*Republished courtesy 3AM Magazine ‘Valorised by the Situationists as a demographic of urban drift and a manifestation of the “no work” ethos, this sub-proletariat is the very opposite of anything that could be called a movement let alone a class, and is perhaps better considered according to the sense of Bataille’s l’informe : that non-category of … Continue reading

The Surrealist Situation of the Object / The Situation of the Surrealist Object (Part 4/4)

*Lecture presented on 29 March 1935, at the Mánes Gallery in Prague and, later on, at the end of April in Zurich. This translation departs from the Czech translation of the original version delivered in Prague. In the French original, the lecture was published in André Breton, Position politique du surrealisme (Paris: Éditions du Sagittaire, … Continue reading

The Surrealist Situation of the Object / The Situation of the Surrealist Object (Part 3/4)

*Lecture presented on 29 March 1935, at the Mánes Gallery in Prague and, later on, at the end of April in Zurich. This translation departs from the Czech translation of the original version delivered in Prague. In the French original, the lecture was published in André Breton, Position politique du surrealisme (Paris: Éditions du Sagittaire, … Continue reading

The Surrealist Situation of the Object / The Situation of the Surrealist Object (Part 2/4)

*Lecture presented on 29 March 1935, at the Mánes Gallery in Prague and, later on, at the end of April in Zurich. This translation departs from the Czech translation of the original version delivered in Prague. In the French original, the lecture was published in André Breton, Position politique du surrealisme (Paris: Éditions du Sagittaire, … Continue reading

The Surrealist Situation of the Object / The Situation of the Surrealist Object (Part 1/4)

*Lecture presented on 29 March 1935, at the Mánes Gallery in Prague and, later on, at the end of April in Zurich. This translation departs from the Czech translation of the original version delivered in Prague. In the French original, the lecture was published in André Breton, Position politique du surrealisme (Paris: Éditions du Sagittaire, … Continue reading

“NO STORY BUT A SPINNING”: DANIELA CASCELLA’S SINGED

“It starts with no story but a circular / It starts with no story but a spinning / It starts with no story but a spinning into before that is to come…” Daniela Cascella’s Singed: Muted voice-transmissions, after the fire starts not with creation, but destruction – a library ravaged by fire. What of the singed debris can … Continue reading

Equus Press in London – Announcements & Invitations

Equus Press is proud to be taking part again in this year’s Small Publishers Fair at Conway Hall, Red Lion Sq, London. Equus books will be available for sale on Friday & Saturday, Nov 10 & 11, from 11am to 7pm daily.

Adolf Hoffmeister, The End of Dada

*Adolf Hoffmeister (1902-1973), Czech writer, playwright, painter & caricaturist. His reviews and interviews with the avant-garde scene in 1930s Paris & New York have been collected in Podoby (1961; Images) and Předobrazy (1962; Adumbrations). His most notable works include his interviews with James Joyce and his 1932 first-ever Czech translation of “Anna Livia Plurabelle” a fragment of Work … Continue reading

“TO WALK, WITH THE CERTAINTY OF SLEEPWALKERS, INTO THE VERY CENTRE OF IMMEDIATE KNOWLEDGE” – Vítězslav Nezval on André Breton

*“Afterword” to André Breton, Co je surrealismus? Tři přednášky [What is Surrealism? Three Lectures], Brno 1937 NOTE: Well-known are André Breton’s visits, in 1934-35, to Prague, during which he delivered three crucial lectures, hailing the city as “the magical capital of old Europe […], one of those cities that electively pin down poetic thought, which is … Continue reading

RICHARD MAKIN’S WORK OF MOURNING

I can’t remember. We’re just below the hospitality hoax at the riverend. By then I was sold: low ebb of gravity hence had already the vision. The things that hatched out of the eggs resembled lizards.[1] Readability bears this mourning: a phrase can be readable, it must be able to become readable, up to a … Continue reading

LANGUAGE IS NEVER INNOCENT

JUAN GOYTISOLO +4.6.2017 “And it’s true that my own birth as a writer coincides in fact with the destruction of my literature, of the literary moulds which in routine fashion I took from tradition.” So reflected the author of alienation & exile, Juan Goytisolo – who this Sunday passed away – in a 1984 interview … Continue reading

Prague’s Indie Writing Scene @ DiverCity Week and Prague Microfestival

By Lisanne Meinen From April 10th to April 13th, Týden Diverzity, or DiverCity Week, will be taking place in a recently renovated building at 4 Hybernská Street. This free four-day festival, run by Charles University, is themed on ‘City and Emotions’, connecting Prague with exhibitions, lectures, discussions and workshops. Events begin at 10am and continue … Continue reading

"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
"It is the business of the future to be dangerous" // A.N. Whitehead

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"Poetism is the crown of life; Constructivism is its basis" // Karel Teige

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“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
August 2019
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