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“Literature from the Event Horizon”: the recent work of Evan Isoline, Mike Corrao, & Dale Brett (Self-Fuck)

David Vichnar of Equus Press continues his series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to some (usually three) of their most recent & interesting titles. In the seventh instalment, the focus is on Evan Isoline’s Self-Fuck Press. According to their mission statement, the title SELFFUCK is designed “to … Continue reading

“Dark, Deviant, Off-Kilter & Thought- Provoking”: a D. Harlan Wilson/Raw Dog Screaming Press Retrospective

David Vichnar of Equus Press continues his series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to some (usually three) of their most recent & interesting titles. In the sixth instalment, the focus is—mono- & polythematically—on the work of D. Harlan Wilson (DHW), his five books brought out by Raw Dog … Continue reading

anatomy of an instant – louis armand’s GlassHouse (by hilbert david)

GlassHouse is the pathology of a convergence of times and places.  It’s a snapshot of an object in four dimensions (an event, its antecedents, and its descendants) which has been broken into shards of various perspectives, and then unrolled. Jacques Derrida described the critique of literature as a type of counter-signature to documents, whose meaning narrates a distinct experience … Continue reading

“Desert travellers, lunatic runners and nomads of the steppes”: the recent work of Lance Olsen, Bonnie Bee, & Harold Jaffe (Anti-Oedipus Press)

To bid farewell to a difficult 2020 and welcome a more hopeful 2021, David Vichnar of Equus Press has penned a series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to three of their most recent & interesting titles. In the fifth instalment, the focus is on three books—one older, … Continue reading

“Going to Hell, and Coming Back”: the recent work of Renny Ramone, Teresa Smith, & James Nulick (Expat Press)

To bid farewell to a difficult 2020 and welcome a more hopeful 2021, David Vichnar of Equus Press has penned a series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to three of their most recent & interesting titles. In the fourth instalment, the focus is on three books lately … Continue reading

“To Miniaturize is also to Conceal”: the recent work of Vik Shirley, Jessica Sequeira, Christina Tudor-Sideri, and Kyle Coma-Thompson & Tristan Foster (Sublunary Editions)

To bid farewell to a difficult 2020 and welcome a more hopeful 2021, David Vichnar of Equus Press has penned a series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to three of their most recent & interesting titles. In the third instalment, the focus is on Seattle-based Sublunary Editions & its … Continue reading

kintsugi of the soul – phillip o’neil’s mental shrapnel (by hilbert david)

The forms we know, on each scale level, have collected into themselves by accretion, from the debris of previous forms. Earth and Sun are stardust, while we ourselves are comprised of fragment proteins, endocrines, and other factors which have joined electrostatically, having found each other within soups of bioplasm… Our lives are arranged from fragments … Continue reading

Three Ritualist Bookscapes: The Recent Work of M Kitchell, John Trefry, & Mike Corrao (Inside the Castle)

To bid farewell to a difficult 2020 and welcome a more hopeful 2021, David Vichnar of Equus Press has penned a series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to three of their most recent & interesting titles. In the second instalment, the focus is on Kansas-based Inside the Castle. 

An Archipelago of Gardens in the Expanded Field of Fiction: Three New Books by 11:11 Press (2020)

Bidding farewell to a difficult 2020 and welcoming a more hopeful 2021, Equus Press’ very own David Vichnar has penned a series of mini-reviews covering the best of contemporary independent small-press production, each instalment dedicated to three of their most recent & interesting titles. In the first instalment, the focus is on Minneapolis-based 11:11 Press. 

“Chapter 37: WarZone 2008” – excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil

“Sinequanon threads of Gonzo journalism tie hot shards of Philip K. Dick’s paranoid fantasies to Kingsley Amis’ insouciant British humour in this 400-page pill, as we are flung between war-torn Sarajevo & post-communist Prague between the early 90s & the late 00s. A war correspondent come psychotherapist, Christopher Mahler, is sequestered into a theatrical vortex … Continue reading

“I could find no symbols in the body of work. All my letters have given up.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXXIII)

XXXIII We are unorchestrate — dark columns in the great fugue, intersecting spindles of light, neural ganglia.                 Or, misdoubt, the art of setting stage or disrupting a unique pictorial event: birdlife clinging to an old man in the square. Saints fly down. I’ll make up my own mind about the crew.             I’ve got the bag with the … Continue reading

“Nothing here is exaggerated. It rains.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter VII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s WORK continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting … Continue reading

“His landscapes, often peopled with bandits and containing scenes of violence, were a subversive influence” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter III)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s WORK continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting … Continue reading

“I remember nothing, which has its advantages in everyday life” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter I)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“All the mockingbirds, hyenas and mosquitoes in my head put to sleep” – excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil

Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of his life. She was killed in the siege of Sarajevo and his ability to live and love again died with her. … Continue reading

“His original name was who” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter VI)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Night. He looks up at the sky, a mesh retreating at the speed of light.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter VIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

” You are no longer on the list. I have loved to death in the past. Is there something I am supposed to be doing.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“This manoeuvre is strategic: your destined path cancels my own” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter X)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“All that remains is an air-filled cavity connected to the throat, containing three tiny linked bones that transmit vibrations” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter X)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX: PeaceZone/WarZone 2008 (excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil)

Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of his life. She was killed in the siege of Sarajevo and his ability to live and love again died with her. … Continue reading

CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR: WarZone 2008 (excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil)

Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of his life. She was killed in the siege of Sarajevo and his ability to live and love again died with her. … Continue reading

“The cause of my insomnia was a simple desire to witness” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Overnight, passersby became so many death vessels” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XV)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“When you have walked through all this indifference, we may finally touch” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXVI)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“An isolated speech event took place in the middle of the critical word” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXVII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

CHAPTER FIVE: Prague 1992 (excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil)

Equus Press is proud to announce the forthcoming publication of MENTAL SHRAPNEL, a novel by Phillip O’Neil. From the pre-publication blurb: “Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of … Continue reading

“The scheduled massacre still took place in the park that afternoon” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XX)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Imagine a room about a film about a journey to a book” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter II)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“A bare monochrome terrain with two distant block houses” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter IV)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

Chapter Thirty-Five: WarZone 2008 (excerpt from MENTAL SHRAPNEL, by Phillip O’Neil)

Equus Press is proud to announce the forthcoming publication of MENTAL SHRAPNEL, a novel by Phillip O’Neil. From the pre-publication blurb: “Chris Mahler was a top psychologist, but that was before the war in Bosnia. Something happened to him during that war – it left him too traumatised to remember. Jasmina was the love of … Continue reading

“Please have your kidneys ready at the barrier” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXXII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“She gave birth to the sky under the spin of an abandoned galaxy. And it was indeed essential for us to ration ourselves” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XIV)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Forgetrance. Today is forgetfulness day; it’s one hundred years since memory collapsed into a trench.” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XVII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“I doubt this will survive you – screams in the street, screams in the sky. There’s no time for quotation” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXVIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“His next novel was a pocketbook: the reader could take it to a riot and it wouldn’t slow her down” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXIII)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

“Occasionally the narrative appears to run on, of a sudden switches penitent for scribe” – Richard Makin, WORK (Chapter XXI)

As Iain Sinclair has observed, Makin’s “writing is that it is. This is prose you must learn to experience before you begin to interpret […] the pages in their beautiful and delirious abstraction are ordered poetry.” Richard Makin’s Work continues the “work” of Mourning by taking stock of “the minutiae of the view, the dissenting details,” … Continue reading

"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
"It is the business of the future to be dangerous" // A.N. Whitehead

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"Poetism is the crown of life; Constructivism is its basis" // Karel Teige

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“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
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