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Breakfast at Midnight

This tag is associated with 5 posts

STANLEY KUBRICK DOES A REMAKE OF THE MAN FROM HONG KONG WITH A BILLION-DOLLAR BUDGET

What the voters for 2014’s Not-the-Booker Prize shortlist had to say about Louis Armand’s CAIRO (photo: poster art for The Man from Hong Kong, dir. Brian Trenchard Smith, 1975): Whatever else I might have discovered if I’d had the chance, I’d still nominate CAIRO by Louis Armand (Equus Press) for the short list because I … Continue reading

EXPERIMENTALISM, PART 4

How do the two other Equus Press titles of 2012 (apart from Armand’s Breakfast at Midnight, analysed here) answer their publishers’ call for translocal experimentalism? By performing two opposite, yet parallel operations: by haunting one’s home by writing of it from abroad, and by inhabiting the abroad through the most unheimlich of its literary ghosts. … Continue reading

EXPERIMENTALISM, PART 3

One of the highlights of 2013 for Equus Press has been the publication of George Bataille’s Louis XXX (trans. Stuart Kendall), a neat little book that holds a multitude, the black&white sparseness of its cover artwork enfolding colourful riches. These riches are not only Bataille’s own, i.e. stored within The Little One and The Tomb … Continue reading

EXPERIMENTALISM, PART 2

In EXPERIMENTALISM, PART 1, “experiment” was traced back to its etymological connection with “experience” as the process of departing from what has been tested, of gaining knowledge by venturing beyond the known grounds – just as Joyce, Borges and Beckett did in both their lives and fiction. The particular sort of experience engaged with in … Continue reading

KAFKAVILLE

A synopsis of Louis Armand’s BREAKFAST AT MIDNIGHT might run as follows: Its nameless narrator has returned to Prague after ten years wandering through Mexico and South America as a fugitive. Back in Prague, the narrator moves into a barge on the Vltava River and searches for his childhood lover, Regen, who ten years earlier … Continue reading

"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
"It is the business of the future to be dangerous" // A.N. Whitehead

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"Poetism is the crown of life; Constructivism is its basis" // Karel Teige

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“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
April 2020
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