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Brigid Brophy

This tag is associated with 4 posts

THE FEARLESS ICONOCLAST

ON BRIGID BROPHY’s IN TRANSIT, by David Vichnar Writing just a few weeks after her death in a Review of Contemporary Fiction issue devoted to her literary legacy, Steven Moore reviewed the reputation of Brigid Brophy (1929-1995) in very bleak terms: “[M]ost of her books are out of print on both sides of the Atlantic … Continue reading

WHOSE AFRAYED OF CHRISTINE BROOKE-ROSE? (2)

OR, TRIBUTE TO THE GREAT BRITISH ENIGMA (Part 2) There is much usefulness in taking the following remark made by the author herself as a possible key to understanding Brooke-Rose’s fiction: I deal in discourses, in the discourses of the world, political, technological, scientific, psychoanalytical, philosophical, ideological, social, emotional, and all the rest, so that … Continue reading

WHOSE AFRAYED OF CHRISTINE BROOKE-ROSE? (1)

OR, TRIBUTE TO THE GREAT BRITISH ENIGMA (Part ONE) Adapted from VLAK 3 (May 2012): 81-94. Photo: Christine Brooke-Rose, 1964   “The Great British Experimentalist You’ve Never Heard Of” was the title of Natalie Ferris’ obituary published in The Guardian two days after Christine Brooke-Rose’s death on March 21, 2012. Apart from other issues, Ferris’ graceful … Continue reading

REALISM’S LAST WORD

*Excerpt from THE ORGAN-GRINDER’S MONKEY: CULTURE AFTER THE AVANT-GARDE, by Louis Armand (Prague: Litteraria Pragensia, 1013). Photo: Philippe Sollers in Shanghai, 1974 (by Julia Kristeva).   “From two recent novels, a story emerges about the future for the Anglophone novel.” So begins an article by Zadie Smith for the New York Review of Books, November … Continue reading

"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
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“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
April 2020
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