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/// philippe sollers

Philippe Sollers is, quite simply, one of the most important post-war French writers, critics and public figures. The avant-garde journal Tel Quel, which he cofounded in 1960 with the writer and art critic Marcelin Pleynet, gave a voice to a whole generation of French theorists, philosophers, writers, & activists. Sollers was also at the forefront of the May 1968 student revolutions in Paris – an experience behind his “external polylogue,” the textual stream entitled H (1973), whose English translation is forthcoming with Equus Press in late 2014. Sollers’ most famous works include Nombres (1966), Lois (1972), Paradis (1981), or Femmes (1983).

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"Modernity today is not in the hands of the poets, but in the hands of the cops" // Louis Aragon
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"Poetism is the crown of life; Constructivism is its basis" // Karel Teige

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“I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for?…we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us” // Franz Kafka, letter to Oskar Pollack, 27 January 1904
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